Trutg dil Flem

Seven Bridges by Jürg Conzett

A very special guidebook to the new mountain trail and its seven bridges crossing the stream, designed by Jürg Conzett, in the mountains around the Swiss holiday resort Flims.

 

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Title Information

Photographs by Wilfried Dechau. Essays by Ursula Baus, Jürg Conzett, Wilfried Dechau, Christian Dettwiler, and Christian Marquart. Plans and drawings by Jürg Conzett

1st edition

, 2013

Texts in English and German

Hardback

192 pages, 68 color and 56 b/w images, 29 plans and sketches

31.5 x 24 cm

ISBN 978-3-85881-374-9

Content

Rising dramatically above the spectacular Swiss landscape surrounding the well-known resort Flims – Laax – Falera, Jürg Conzett’s unique mountain trail contains seven bridges crossing a wild stream. An internationally renowned civil engineer, Conzett brought his considerable talent and experience to this project, and the results are groundbreaking and visually appealing. Each bridge uses a different type of construction and building method depending on the specific geographic features of its location. Wilfried Dechau has catalogued the project with over one hundred previously unpublished images of the bridges and their surrounding landscape. His atmospheric photographs provide readers with a beautiful and up-close look at both the striking architecture amid the beautiful wilderness. Also included in this book are sketches and plans by Conzett and a series of essays by Dechau, Conzett, Ursula Baus, Christian Dettwiler, and Christian Marquart.

Authors & Editors

Ursula Baus

Jürg Conzett

Wilfried Dechau

Christian Dettwiler

Christian Marquart

Praise

«A wonderful juxtaposition between the natural rugged landscape and the seven elegant yet simple structures dotting the mountain trail is evident thoughout Trutg dil Flem. Author Wilfried Dechau’s photographs, which make up the entirety of this book, will please nature lovers as well as architects and designers – a notable design book of 2013.» Designers & Books

 

«Examining our relationship with the landscape and how we use it, the book raises an interesting challenge to its readers. Questions arise that test our perception on what makes a good photo, and whether the emphasis should be on the idea behind the image or on its execution. A beautifully written introduction asks us to consider how magnificence in nature doesn’t have to be on an epic scale; it could be waiting to be discovered underneath leaf litter or fallen pine trees. The printing and design echo the tranquillity of the images, which show how nature and man can synthesise.» Outdoor Photography