Carole A. Feuerman

Carole A. Feuerman

Fifty Years of Looking Good

Elegant, dreamy swimmers: Carole A. Feuerman's lifelike figures meet us as precisely captured snapshots

 

 

Titelinformation

Edited by John T. Spike. With contributions by Claudia Moscovici and John Yau

1st edition

, 2020

Text Englisch

Hardback

192 pages, 120 color illustrations

24 x 30 cm

ISBN 978-3-85881-844-7

Inhalt

Carole A. Feuerman is celebrated as a pioneer and one of America’s major exponents of Hyperrealism in sculpture, alongside Duane Hanson and John De Andrea. Born 1945 and educated in New York and Philadelphia, she began as an illustrator before turning to sculpture in the 1970s, soon gaining much recognition and early success. Her work has been displayed in many group shows and solo exhibitions at private galleries and public museums, as well as at major art fairs, in America, Europe, and Asia. Over five decades, Feuerman has created visual manifestations of stories telling of strength, survival, and balance. Her subject matter is the human figure, most often a woman in an introspective moment of exuberant self-consciousness shaded by erotic lassitude. Feuerman’s works represent a female state of mind rather that an alluring body meant to attract the male gaze. They suggest that women look at themselves differently from men looking at them, that a woman is more innately creative than a man. This book is the most comprehensive survey of Feuerman’s oeuvre to date. Lavishly illustrated in color throughout, it demonstrates the variety of materials and media she uses and highlights the specific qualities of her figures.

 

John T. Spike  is an American art historian. He lives and works in Italy as a curator, author, lecturer and critic of contemporary art.

Autoren & Herausgeber
Echo

«Nur wenige Künstler bekennen sich so selbstbewusst zur Ästhetik des Oberflächlichen wie die US-Bildhauerin Carole A. Feuerman. Der Bildband illustriert, wie sie der in den Siebzigerjahren angebrochenen Epoche der Wellness huldigt.» Ulrich Klötzer, Der Spiegel